A complete list of pets in the world.

Country information and links to pets clubs and info about pets books and equipment.

All pets in the world, with country information and links to pets clubs and info about pets books and equipment.

All About pets intends to show a complete list of websites with pets- and pets-Clubs with their specific location and qualifications.

Where possible is also available an overview of the local- or country-information and links to books about pets and pets equipment.

The search facility makes it easy to look for specific information, just by typing a name, location or part of a name.

Interesting for travelers is the list of Airport- and Airline-topics, regarding "Experiences to share with others".

The homepage of the All about pets is showing up all the countries we have in our data base. We try to keep the information about each country so up-to-date as possible; but if you have any remark or contribution to improve our websites, you are very welcome.

You may find information on our web site about pets in the following countries: Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Canada, China PRC, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Laos, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Vietnam.

The search option makes it easy to find within a country all the pets within one city, state or province.

But there are also links to general websites about other related subjects:

All About the Olympics; A collection of links about the Olympics. Past, present and future. Your one stop site, to know everything about the Olympics! www.olympic-paralympic-games.com.

All About Airlines; Airports, Airlines and Airways connected to one hub. One stop guide to your airport, airlines and airways in absolutely any place around the world! ww.airways-airlines-airports.com.

I want to Beijing; Host City for the Olympics 2008! Capital City of the Awakening Giant of the East! Everything about China, converge in one place!. www.12beijing.com.

eBooks and Programs about pets; a selection of pet related books and on-line training programs.

Friends, dating and relationships; making friends, finding dates and what about a good relationship.

Our home page All about pets, will to be a good start to search for pets , pets clubs and pets resorts anywhere in the world; best-quality-products or value-for-money, dedicated especially for visitors from abroad, tourists and for those who wanted to have a comprehensive tool to find the Best of the Best.

Our home page All about pets, will to be a good start to search for pets , pets clubs and pets resorts anywhere in the world; best-quality-products or value-for-money, dedicated especially for visitors from abroad, tourists and for those who wanted to have a comprehensive tool to find the Best of the Best.

If you are interested to be shown up on our website as company or a provider of public or business services, you may contact us at: mailto:memo@12ny.com.

2008 copyright: www.world-pets-.com the source of information about World pets , pets clubs, books and equipment.

 
 
 
 
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All About Pets

All About Pets website intends to show information about pets and domestic animals all over the world. Our comprehensive listing will surely be a great help in your research for pets information.

The apparent multitude of pets can leave one confused. Hence, we came up with this listing. This listing has been intensively researched so that we can give both non-formal and scientific information related to pets and domestic animals.

We sincerely hope that this site will ease your search among many kinds of animals. Enjoy and learn more.

Have a great day!

     
 


  

Fox

Fox is a name applied to any of roughly 27 species of small to medium-sized canids, characterized by possessing a long, narrow snout, and a bushy tail, or "brush". By far the most common and widespread species of fox is the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), although various species are found on almost every continent. The presence of fox-like carnivores all over the globe has led to their appearance in the popular culture and folklore of many nations, tribes, and other cultural groups (see Foxes in culture).

The Modern English "fox" is derived from Old English fox. The Old English word itself comes from the Proto-Germanic word *fukh compare German Fuchs, Gothic fauho, Old Norse foa and Dutch vos. It corresponds to the Proto-Indo-European word *puke meaning "tail" (compare Sanskrit puccha, also "tail"). The bushy tail is also the source of the word for fox in Welsh: llwynog, from llwyn, "bush", Lithuanian: uodegis, from uodega, "tail", and Portuguese: raposa, from rabo, "tail".

Dogs (male foxes) weigh on average, 5.9kg and vixens (female foxes) weigh less, at 5.2kg (13 lbs and 11.5 lbs, respectively).

Most foxes live 2 to 3 years, but they can survive for up to 10 years or even longer in captivity. Foxes are generally smaller than other members of the family Canidae such as wolves, jackals, and domestic dogs. Fox-like features typically include an acute muzzle (a "fox face") and bushy tail. Other physical characteristics vary according to their habitat. For example, the fennec fox (and other species of foxes adapted to life in the desert, such as the kit fox) has large ears and short fur, whereas the Arctic fox has small ears and thick, insulating fur.

Another example is the red fox which has a typical auburn pelt, the tail normally ending with white marking.

Unlike many canids, foxes are usually not pack animals. Typically, they are solitary, opportunistic feeders that hunt live prey (especially rodents). Using a pouncing technique practiced from an early age, they are usually able to kill their prey quickly. Foxes also gather a wide variety of other foods ranging from grasshoppers to fruit and berries.

Foxes are normally extremely wary of humans and are not kept as pets (with the exception of the fennec); however, the silver fox was successfully domesticated in Russia after a 45 year selective breeding program. This selective breeding also resulted in physical and behavioural traits appearing that are frequently seen in domestic cats, dogs, and other animals: pigmentation changes, floppy ears, and curly tails.

Canids commonly known as foxes include members of the following genera:

The diet of foxes comprises rodents, insects, worms, fruit, fish, birds, eggs, and all other kinds of small animals. The fox generally consumes around 1 kg of food every day. Foxes that live in neighborhoods mainly depend on household waste and even rodents and birds that keep moving around these areas. Foxes are known to cache their food, burying the excess for later consumption.

They mostly thrive in the higher latitudes, suburban and even urban environments both in Europe and in North America. They are found also in Eurasia, North Africa, India (Ladakh, Himalayas, Jammu and Kashmir, Rajasthan and Gujarat), China, Japan and in Australia.

Foxes are readily found in cities and cultivated areas and (depending upon species) seem to adapt reasonably well to human presence.

Red foxes have been introduced into Australia and some other countries for hunting. Australia lacks similar carnivores, and the introduced foxes prey on native wildlife, some to the point of extinction. A similar introduction occurred in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in temperate North America, where European reds (Vulpes vulpes) were brought to the colonies for fox hunting, where they decimated the American red fox population through more aggressive hunting and breeding. Interbreeding with American reds, traits of the European red eventually pervaded the gene pool, leaving European and American foxes now virtually identical.

Other fox species do not adapt as well as the red fox, and are endangered in their native environments. Key among these are the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous) and the African bat-eared fox. Other foxes such as fennecs, are not endangered, but will be if humans encroach further into their habitat.

Foxes have been successfully employed to control pests on fruit farms, where they leave the fruit intact.

Historians believe foxes were imported into non-native environments long before the colonial era. The first example of the introduction of the fox into a new habitat by humans seems to be Neolithic Cyprus. Stone carvings representing foxes have been found in the early settlement of Gbekli Tepe in eastern Turkey.